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VITAMIN C

Pure ascorbic acid (the chemical identity of Vitamin C) is very unstable in air and light and degrades in seconds upon exposure to become a brown colored oxide with very slight biological activity. This has given rise to stabilizing the molecule by converting the acid to an ester or a salt.

When these are applied to the skin, the body uses its own enzymes to un-package the stable molecule and deliver ascorbic acid directly as a metabolite to the cell. Exactly as happens with the Vitamin A molecules. And like Vitamin A, Vitamin C has specific receptors in the skin. These receptors easily are overloaded and shut down because of over frequent application and the skin outcome is visibly unhappy.

There are many theories as to what sort of molecule best stabilizes and delivers the most ascorbic acid to the cell. This has caused a Vitamin C content race with the greatest percentage in the formula claiming victory.

Of course after a point it doesn’t matter how much ester or salt is applied, even if 100%. The body cannot utilize so much of a good thing and reservoirs the molecules until it can haul them off to a landfill where other cellular waste is kept and later on in life becomes an unsightly age or pigment spot.

The skin wastes valuable metabolic energy processing too much Vitamin C in whatever form. It quickly ‘learns’ that Vitamin C in such an overload is toxic and begins to shut down receptors.

At that point, usually within a few weeks, you will have a sad face and believe the product no longer works. Your skincare pro told you to apply it every day twice per day because that is what the manufacturer said to do and now look what has happened.

Don’t follow directions.

Vitamin C goes to work primarily in the dermis to build out cells and provide needed energy.

However, it must not be used more than 2x per week, at any concentration. The body must be surprised with every application or it quickly shuts off the receptors and no good things will happen afterward.

Vitamin C in its various topical forms seems also to give UV waves a boost to cause even more damage to the skin. It is interesting that Vitamin A also gives a boost to UV damage. This occurs with both vitamins when they are on the skin during sunlight exposure.

Away from sun exposure the opposite is true and that Vitamin A topically helps repair UV damage, and likewise Vitamin C but to a much less extent. With both vitamins it is important to limit the frequency of topical application or the benefits become liabilities.

After a month to six weeks of twice per week application, discontinue for two months. See THE TRAINING MODEL for more on this technique of intermittent or non-continuous applications)

Apply in the evening and keep out of sun the next day.

Avoid products, often so-called sunscreens, that contain Vitamin A or C and promote themselves to be used during sun exposure. This is asking for skin cancer and even large companies who should know better do it.

VITAMIN C

Pure ascorbic acid (the chemical identity of Vitamin C) is very unstable in air and light and degrades in seconds upon exposure to become a brown colored oxide with very slight biological activity. This has given rise to stabilizing the molecule by converting the acid to an ester or a salt.

When these are applied to the skin, the body uses its own enzymes to un-package the stable molecule and deliver ascorbic acid directly as a metabolite to the cell. Exactly as happens with the Vitamin A molecules. And like Vitamin A, Vitamin C has specific receptors in the skin. These receptors easily are overloaded and shut down because of over frequent application and the skin outcome is visibly unhappy.

There are many theories as to what sort of molecule best stabilizes and delivers the most ascorbic acid to the cell. This has caused a Vitamin C content race with the greatest percentage in the formula claiming victory.

Of course after a point it doesn’t matter how much ester or salt is applied, even if 100%. The body cannot utilize so much of a good thing and reservoirs the molecules until it can haul them off to a landfill where other cellular waste is kept and later on in life becomes an unsightly age or pigment spot.

The skin wastes valuable metabolic energy processing too much Vitamin C in whatever form. It quickly ‘learns’ that Vitamin C in such an overload is toxic and begins to shut down receptors.

At that point, usually within a few weeks, you will have a sad face and believe the product no longer works. Your skincare pro told you to apply it every day twice per day because that is what the manufacturer said to do and now look what has happened.

Don’t follow directions.

Vitamin C goes to work primarily in the dermis to build out cells and provide needed energy.

However, it must not be used more than 2x per week, at any concentration. The body must be surprised with every application or it quickly shuts off the receptors and no good things will happen afterward.

Vitamin C in its various topical forms seems also to give UV waves a boost to cause even more damage to the skin. It is interesting that Vitamin A also gives a boost to UV damage. This occurs with both vitamins when they are on the skin during sunlight exposure.

Away from sun exposure the opposite is true and that Vitamin A topically helps repair UV damage, and likewise Vitamin C but to a much less extent. With both vitamins it is important to limit the frequency of topical application or the benefits become liabilities.

After a month to six weeks of twice per week application, discontinue for two months. See THE TRAINING MODEL for more on this technique of intermittent or non-continuous applications)

Apply in the evening and keep out of sun the next day.

Avoid products, often so-called sunscreens, that contain Vitamin A or C and promote themselves to be used during sun exposure. This is asking for skin cancer and even large companies who should know better do it.