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SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MASK & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

SPECIAL PROMOTION: FREE CALMING MASK & USA SHIPPING WITH $50 ORDER

REFERENCE TOPICS

Vitamin B

There are many players in the B vitamin family (at least eight and counting) and some, like niacinamide, and its base form, nicotinic acid (niacin) are particularly reactive on skin.

The “niacin flush” is used to stimulate dilation of the blood vessels to increase circulation temporarily. This will last for up to an hour. Lightly pigmented skin will see a noticeable pinking and even reddening and then it subsides as the skin deactivates the molecules.

Many marketers make a big thing of the concentration of niacin in their product. What works is what works for you and a low concentration is more desirable than a high one if you would like to avoid an unwanted over reaction.

The idea of increasing circulation with a niacin flush is not a bad one but this technique can be easily abused and lead to serious dermatitis, especially by those who apply this at regular intervals.

The problem with aged skin, grandma skin, is that it is impervious and often unreactive to normal topical products. It is often dry and metabolically inactive. The use of the niacin flush can sometimes help to re-awaken this aged skin by increasing circulation dramatically. Of course the effect is temporary and should be supported with petrissage and other techniques like ultrasound and micro-current to ensure vitality (see PROCEDURES / INSTRUMENTS in the REFERENCE TOPICS)

Vitamin B variants are often found in hair care products but not as much in skincare. The reasons have to do with the overall ‘sticky’ nature of many of these molecules. This is desirable in building out body in hair but not so much in skincare.

All of these Vitamin B molecules will build out / increase overall the quantity of skin protein, but as with any other metabolite, over frequent topical application is a problem in the quality of cells department.

Some skin problems arise and remain mysterious whose cause lies in the dietary uptake of the various B vitamins. If you have a skin problem and are unsure of its source, then consider your dietary uptake of B1, B3 (niacin), B5, B6, B12 and so on which may be too little or too much. We are all different in our needs for these metabolites and these needs change as we age. Much is unknown so you may need to go through a careful evaluation of dietary uptake of these important vitamins one by one.

The B vitamins ALL convert food into energy and one key marker of aged skin is its inability to do that job. Applying lots of B vitamins to the skin in hopes of kick starting the sluggish metabolism of unresponsive skin may do the reverse and create inflammation. Vitamin B1 seems to be the best candidate to begin that topical test. Some interesting work with B1 analogs was done not long ago and found to be restorative for many people.

There are no specific Vitamin B family receptors in the skin, unlike Vitamin A or C, but these B metabolites are not ignored.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Vitamin B

There are many players in the B vitamin family (at least eight and counting) and some, like niacinamide, and its base form, nicotinic acid (niacin) are particularly reactive on skin.

The “niacin flush” is used to stimulate dilation of the blood vessels to increase circulation temporarily. This will last for up to an hour. Lightly pigmented skin will see a noticeable pinking and even reddening and then it subsides as the skin deactivates the molecules.

Many marketers make a big thing of the concentration of niacin in their product. What works is what works for you and a low concentration is more desirable than a high one if you would like to avoid an unwanted over reaction.

The idea of increasing circulation with a niacin flush is not a bad one but this technique can be easily abused and lead to serious dermatitis, especially by those who apply this at regular intervals.

The problem with aged skin, grandma skin, is that it is impervious and often unreactive to normal topical products. It is often dry and metabolically inactive. The use of the niacin flush can sometimes help to re-awaken this aged skin by increasing circulation dramatically. Of course the effect is temporary and should be supported with petrissage and other techniques like ultrasound and micro-current to ensure vitality (see PROCEDURES / INSTRUMENTS in the REFERENCE TOPICS)

Vitamin B variants are often found in hair care products but not as much in skincare. The reasons have to do with the overall ‘sticky’ nature of many of these molecules. This is desirable in building out body in hair but not so much in skincare.

All of these Vitamin B molecules will build out / increase overall the quantity of skin protein, but as with any other metabolite, over frequent topical application is a problem in the quality of cells department.

Some skin problems arise and remain mysterious whose cause lies in the dietary uptake of the various B vitamins. If you have a skin problem and are unsure of its source, then consider your dietary uptake of B1, B3 (niacin), B5, B6, B12 and so on which may be too little or too much. We are all different in our needs for these metabolites and these needs change as we age. Much is unknown so you may need to go through a careful evaluation of dietary uptake of these important vitamins one by one.

The B vitamins ALL convert food into energy and one key marker of aged skin is its inability to do that job. Applying lots of B vitamins to the skin in hopes of kick starting the sluggish metabolism of unresponsive skin may do the reverse and create inflammation. Vitamin B1 seems to be the best candidate to begin that topical test. Some interesting work with B1 analogs was done not long ago and found to be restorative for many people.

There are no specific Vitamin B family receptors in the skin, unlike Vitamin A or C, but these B metabolites are not ignored.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Vitamin B

There are many players in the B vitamin family (at least eight and counting) and some, like niacinamide, and its base form, nicotinic acid (niacin) are particularly reactive on skin.

The “niacin flush” is used to stimulate dilation of the blood vessels to increase circulation temporarily. This will last for up to an hour. Lightly pigmented skin will see a noticeable pinking and even reddening and then it subsides as the skin deactivates the molecules.

Many marketers make a big thing of the concentration of niacin in their product. What works is what works for you and a low concentration is more desirable than a high one if you would like to avoid an unwanted over reaction.

The idea of increasing circulation with a niacin flush is not a bad one but this technique can be easily abused and lead to serious dermatitis, especially by those who apply this at regular intervals.

The problem with aged skin, grandma skin, is that it is impervious and often unreactive to normal topical products. It is often dry and metabolically inactive. The use of the niacin flush can sometimes help to re-awaken this aged skin by increasing circulation dramatically. Of course the effect is temporary and should be supported with petrissage and other techniques like ultrasound and micro-current to ensure vitality (see PROCEDURES / INSTRUMENTS in the REFERENCE TOPICS)

Vitamin B variants are often found in hair care products but not as much in skincare. The reasons have to do with the overall ‘sticky’ nature of many of these molecules. This is desirable in building out body in hair but not so much in skincare.

All of these Vitamin B molecules will build out / increase overall the quantity of skin protein, but as with any other metabolite, over frequent topical application is a problem in the quality of cells department.

Some skin problems arise and remain mysterious whose cause lies in the dietary uptake of the various B vitamins. If you have a skin problem and are unsure of its source, then consider your dietary uptake of B1, B3 (niacin), B5, B6, B12 and so on which may be too little or too much. We are all different in our needs for these metabolites and these needs change as we age. Much is unknown so you may need to go through a careful evaluation of dietary uptake of these important vitamins one by one.

The B vitamins ALL convert food into energy and one key marker of aged skin is its inability to do that job. Applying lots of B vitamins to the skin in hopes of kick starting the sluggish metabolism of unresponsive skin may do the reverse and create inflammation. Vitamin B1 seems to be the best candidate to begin that topical test. Some interesting work with B1 analogs was done not long ago and found to be restorative for many people.

There are no specific Vitamin B family receptors in the skin, unlike Vitamin A or C, but these B metabolites are not ignored.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

REFERENCE TOPICS

Vitamin B

There are many players in the B vitamin family (at least eight and counting) and some, like niacinamide, and its base form, nicotinic acid (niacin) are particularly reactive on skin.

The “niacin flush” is used to stimulate dilation of the blood vessels to increase circulation temporarily. This will last for up to an hour. Lightly pigmented skin will see a noticeable pinking and even reddening and then it subsides as the skin deactivates the molecules.

Many marketers make a big thing of the concentration of niacin in their product. What works is what works for you and a low concentration is more desirable than a high one if you would like to avoid an unwanted over reaction.

The idea of increasing circulation with a niacin flush is not a bad one but this technique can be easily abused and lead to serious dermatitis, especially by those who apply this at regular intervals.

The problem with aged skin, grandma skin, is that it is impervious and often unreactive to normal topical products. It is often dry and metabolically inactive. The use of the niacin flush can sometimes help to re-awaken this aged skin by increasing circulation dramatically. Of course the effect is temporary and should be supported with petrissage and other techniques like ultrasound and micro-current to ensure vitality (see PROCEDURES / INSTRUMENTS in the REFERENCE TOPICS)

Vitamin B variants are often found in hair care products but not as much in skincare. The reasons have to do with the overall ‘sticky’ nature of many of these molecules. This is desirable in building out body in hair but not so much in skincare.

All of these Vitamin B molecules will build out / increase overall the quantity of skin protein, but as with any other metabolite, over frequent topical application is a problem in the quality of cells department.

Some skin problems arise and remain mysterious whose cause lies in the dietary uptake of the various B vitamins. If you have a skin problem and are unsure of its source, then consider your dietary uptake of B1, B3 (niacin), B5, B6, B12 and so on which may be too little or too much. We are all different in our needs for these metabolites and these needs change as we age. Much is unknown so you may need to go through a careful evaluation of dietary uptake of these important vitamins one by one.

The B vitamins ALL convert food into energy and one key marker of aged skin is its inability to do that job. Applying lots of B vitamins to the skin in hopes of kick starting the sluggish metabolism of unresponsive skin may do the reverse and create inflammation. Vitamin B1 seems to be the best candidate to begin that topical test. Some interesting work with B1 analogs was done not long ago and found to be restorative for many people.

There are no specific Vitamin B family receptors in the skin, unlike Vitamin A or C, but these B metabolites are not ignored.

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